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Make a Pincushion

Make a  Pincushion

I had two pincushions: one overused one from my grandmother (I don't feel right about 'fixing' it yet) and the infamous tomato. You know the tomato I'm talking about right? The one at every craft store. Practical, but unoriginal and ugly.

Now, I have a cute one made on the cheap. Follow me below…

Materials:

  • Tealight candle holder (Hobby Lobby)
  • Filling
  • Fabric
  • Hot glue and gun
  • Scissors
  • Needle and thread

Cut a square piece of fabric about 6 inches by 6 inches. Center the fabric face down on top of the candle holder. Now, squish the filling down into the candle holder.

Twist the edges and fold them all in.

Using a needle and thread, sew the edges together. It doesn't have to be perfect because we'll be using hot glue below.

Squeeze a bunch of hot glue into only the bottom of the candle holder. You don't need to put hot glue along the sides because as you put the pincushion in, the glue will squish up the sides. Holding the pincushion upright, place it into the candle holder and hold down firmly until the glue is dry. 

The Real Deal: The tealight candle holder cost $1. The amount of fabric and filling I used was less than $1. Quite a cute pincushion for $2!

Confessions of a Craft Snob

Confessions of a Craft Snob

  1. This is my 36 week belly bump. I added a bow on top because it'll be like opening a sweet little present in 4 weeks. (nevermind the labor pain)
  2. I gained as much weight in my first pregnancy as my second and third pregnancies combined.
  3. Off topic, but since I am confessing… I tend to think tattoos are repulsive. I understand that they are an expression of art, but couldn't it be expressed on a card or in a frame?

Go and be pretty,

Sara

 

6 Free Creepy Fonts

6 Free Creepy Fonts

I'm over on Momtastic today sharing some of my favorite creepy fonts. Stomp on over there to get the free fonts (or 'type face' if you are too snobby to use 'fonts') to use on your Halloween decorations and invitations.

Does 'Go and be pretty' really go with this post?

Sara

Make Bumble Bee Hair Clips

Make Bumble Bee Hair Clips

These cute bumble bee hair clips would be the perfect accessory for your bumble bee costume. Or, if you don't feel like going all out for Halloween, try wearing a pair of these clips so you aren't totally left out of the crowd.

 Materials:

  • Hair clips (from Hobby Lobby)
  • Pom Poms (from Hobby Lobby)
  • Hot glue and gun
  • Floral wire (or equivalent)
  • Wire cutters
  • Small cylindrical shaped tool

Cut a 6 inch piece of floral wire. Wrap the wire around a small cylindrical shaped tool, leaving about 1 or 2 inches straight on one end.

Remove the wire from the tool. Open the hair clip and insert the wire as shown.

Wrap the wire around the hair clip. Floral wire is pretty stiff so the wrapping should stay in place.

Hot glue a pom pom to the top of the wire.

Now who wouldn’t smile at someone wearing a pair of these bumble bee clips?

The Real Deal: It cost less than $2.00 to make a pair of bumble bee hair clips.

Go and be pretty,

Sara

Make a Growth Chart

Make a Growth Chart

My little ones are becoming not so little all too fast. It's time to keep track of 'em growing like weeds! I decided to make each of my kids a growth chart that catered to their personalities. Peaches = Ruffles.

Materials:

  • Scissors or something to cut with
  • Canvas
  • Patterned fabric
  • Dowel rods
  • String
  • Sewing machine and thread

I used a piece of canvas 5.5 feet long by 5 inches wide as the base for the growth chart. To create the ruffle, I used 4 strips of a patterned cotton fabric 4 feet long by 3 inches wide, for a total length of 15 feet.

Fold under all sides of the canvas and sew with a 1/4 inch allowance. Do the same for the cotton fabric.

Work from the bottom of the growth chart to the top. Lay the cotton fabric face down on the front face of the canvas. Sew a line as indicated in the picture above.

After you have sewn a line like the previous picture, fold the end of the canvas under. Sew a line straight across the canvas to create the dowel rod insert.

Remember, this is the bottom of the growth chart. Fold the fabric 3 times as indicated by the arrows. Then sew a line across to hold in place. Repeat this for each ruffle. The next 3 photos are repeating the process for the next ruffle.

Sew another straight line, completing another ruffle.

Continue making ruffles the entire length of the growth chart until just before you reach the top. You should have excess fabric to fold under as seen above.

This is the top end of the growth chart. Fold back the cotton fabric at the last sewn line. Then fold under the canvas to accommodate a dowel rod.

Fold the remaining cotton fabric under 3 times. If you have too much left over, simply cut it off.  Sew a straight line all the way across the canvas and cotton fabric as indicated above.

Now the ruffle is complete and the top and bottom of the growth chart can accommodate dowel rods. With a pencil, mark along the edge of the chart for every inch.

Sew a wide zigzag stitch to mark each foot measurement, or for every 12 inches.  Sew a straight line to mark each inch measurement.

Insert a dowel rod in the top and bottom of the growth chart. Tie a string about the top dowel rod to hang. You can see this in the second picture (collage) from the top.

Peaches' growth chart starts measuring at 2 feet. I measured 2 feet off the floor and aligned the first zigzag stitch with that height. Here you can see each inch is marked with a smaller, finer, straight line and each foot mark is marked with a longer, wider zigzag stitch.

And that's how to make a kids growth chart! Just mark and date each entry with a pencil, pen, or marker.

The Real Deal: The canvas was recycled from a college canvas laundry bag. The dowel rods were sticks from popsicles my kids ate. I think I paid less then $3.00 for the cotton fabric. Not a bad price at all for a DIY growth chart!

Go and be pretty,

Sara

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